All posts filed under: all publications

Audible Walls, Breathing Vaults, and the Fantastic Sites of Re-Imagination

Based on a presentation at the Media Art Histories conference in Riga, Latvia a couple of years ago, the final paper of my longstanding Polish media art project has been published in Acoustic Space #15: Open Fields. Art and Science Research Practices in the Network Society. It looks at the fantastic as a productive mode of re-imagination and re-making, inspired by that famous Shklovsy notion of ostraniene, or defamiliarization. The article turns to Polish media artworks that—through images, experiences, and encounters —are not only strange but also disruptive, challenging the architectures, broadly defined, of the contemporary condition. Dominik Lejman’s Breathing Cathedral (2005) provides a case of a media art practice that harnesses the interplay between materiality and immateriality to re-imagine urban history, civic politics and architectural heritage; in Making the Walls Quake… (2012) Katarzyna Krakowiak creates a space where architecture becomes audible; and in She-Ona: Media Story (2008) Izabella Gustowska produces a fantastical experience of our mediated environment in a way that reflects back on the structures of the digital condition and transforms the technologies …

Polish Media Art in an Expanded Field

Polish Media Art in an Expanded Field (Intellect/University of Chicago Press, February 2016) Publisher’s website Polish Media Art in an Expanded Field situates media art—as technologies, practices, and experiences—in the politics of postsocialist Eastern Europe. It considers how artistic activity became representative of the tensions between global cosmopolitanism and national self-enfranchisement after Poland joined the European Union in 2004. Within this context, the book considers how media artists questioned and reimagined their site—historically, politically, technologically—and situates their works within the specific ecology of Poland’s aesthetic traditions and political history. This expansion of the global history of media art to include Eastern Europe’s heritage explores a key moment in Europe’s political and cultural history that brings together art history and criticism, media and cultural studies, globalization and nationalism studies, and political theory. In order to articulate a site-specific context to an art form often considered as belonging to the “non-place” of a global digital culture, the book proposes a genealogy of Polish media art through the lens of Polish experimentation, one that includes the Constructivists of …

Technologies of Wonder

I chaired a special session panel called “Technologies of Wonder ” for the New Media Caucus at the 2015 College Art Association meeting. The papers were then published in Media-N. The entire issue is available online, including my intro, and my paper on “Seeing Nano: Vision, Optics, and the Sight of Impossible Things.”

Designing Nano-Media Across Disciplines

As part of my Postdoc with SFU, I worked with a lab specializing in nano-optics. One of my interests was to bring artists to the lab to see how we could engage and present this emerging technology in innovative and creative ways. The result was an insert featured in the journal PUBLIC. The story of the project, including technical background, connections with art- and media- making processes, as well as production/manufacturing challenges, are discussed in a paper I presented at ISEA 2015 called “Designing Nano-Media Across Disciplines: Circular Genealogies and Collaborative Methodologies at the Optical Frontier,” which can be found here.

Real and Virtual Histories of Past and Future in the Heritage Village

This paper considers the immaterial aspects of the history of land as way to reimagine heritage. Through the heritage village – that imagined, artificial, and curated representation of history with very particular kinds of material iterations and legacies of the past – we consider the immaterial memories and histories that have becomes absent from the staging and design of heritage as collective history. We examine the way that these omissions function in the imagination of the present and future by turning to the site-specific contemporary art exhibition Land/Slide Possible Futures (2013). Located on the site of Markham Museum heritage village in Ontario, Canada, this expansive project reveals the imbricated histories of the rise of the heritage village and that of the suburb. Turning to Duke & Battesby’s Always Popular, Never Cool and Terrance Houle’s There’s Things That Even a Drunk Will Never Forget, among others, we argue for the heritage village as a lieu de mémoire, where memories are continuously unearthed, revealed, and imagined, and where artists transform archival collections and historical architectures into surreal …

Land|Slide Possible Futures Catalogue

I co-edited the catalogue for the Land|Slide: Possible Futures exhibition with Janine Marchessault, Chloë Brushwood Rose, and Jennifer Foster. This is an exhibtion that took place at the Markham Museum and Heritage Village in Markham, Ontario in 2013. The catalogue includes essays by each of the editors as well as by Shelley Hornstein, Julie Nagam and Yan Wu. Making up the bulk of the book is full-colour documentation of the over 30+ artist projects, including statements by all the artists: Iain Baxter& | Andrew Bieler and Heather Rigby | Blue Republic | Angel Chen | Aron Louis Cohen | Dave Colangelo and Patricio Davila | Christine Davis | Department of Unusual Certainties | Duke and Battersby | Caitlin Fisher, Tony Vieira, and Tristan Prescott | Ken Gregory | David Han | Frank Havermans | Philip Hoffman | Mark-David Hosale | Terrance Houle | Maria Hupfield | Adrian Blackwell and Jane Hutton | Ali Kazimi | David Kidman | L+ | Deirdre Logue | Glynis Logue | Marman and Borins | Allyson Mitchell | MMM: Lisa …

Public?

PUBLIC 37: Public? 20th Anniversary Issue, Spring 2008 Edited by Aleksandra Kaminska, Janine Marchessault, and Jason Rovito “In seeking to capture the journal’s ambition to interrogate and complicate this very terrain, we have replaced the period with the question mark: is public still a useful term with which we can think about culture and politics, art and technology? Does it remain relevant to our efforts to define the political and imagine new forms of intervention, engagement, and interference that may transform the parameters of citizenship, community, and our understandings of democracy? In short: does public mean anything anymore?” — The Editors, from the introduction, which you can read in full here. Table of contents